Hazardous trace elements in Tennessee soils and other regolith
Read Online
Share

Hazardous trace elements in Tennessee soils and other regolith

  • 408 Want to read
  • ·
  • 37 Currently reading

Published by State of Tennessee, Dept. of Environment & Conservation, Division of Geology in [Nashville, Tenn.] .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Tennessee.

Subjects:

  • Soils -- Trace element content -- Tennessee.,
  • Hazardous wastes -- Tracking -- Tennessee.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Otto C. Kopp.
SeriesReport of investigations ;, no. 49, Report of investigations (Tennessee. Division of Geology) ;, 49.
ContributionsTennessee. Division of Geology.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQE165 .A26 no. 49
The Physical Object
Pagination135 p. :
Number of Pages135
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3746347M
LC Control Number2003426748
OCLC/WorldCa47721042

Download Hazardous trace elements in Tennessee soils and other regolith

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

Hazardous Trace Elements in Tennessee Soils and Other Regolith. Otto C. Kopp. State of Tennessee, Department of Environment & Conservation, Division of Geology, - Hazardous wastes - pages. 0 Reviews. What people are saying - Write a review. Open Library is an open, editable library catalog, building towards a web page for every book ever published. Hazardous trace elements in Tennessee soils and other regolith by Otto C. Kopp; 1 edition; Subjects: Soils, Tracking, Hazardous wastes, Trace element content; Places: Tennessee. Trace elements occur naturally in soils and some are essential nutrients for plant growth as well as human and animal health. However, at elevated levels, all trace elements become potentially toxic. While most trace elements in soils are beneficial to plant growth, a buildup of trace elements may have a negative effect on whoever eats the plant. Trace elements may also degrade water quality.

Etymology. The term regolith combines two Greek words: rhegos (ῥῆγος), 'blanket', and lithos (), 'rock'. The American geologist George P. Merrill first defined the term in , writing. In places this covering is made up of material originating through rock-weathering or plant growth in other instances it is of fragmental and more or less decomposed matter drifted by wind. Summary. Still the Gold Standard Resource on Trace Elements and Metals in Soils. This highly anticipated fourth edition of the bestselling Trace Elements in Soils and Plants reflects the explosion of research during the past decade regarding the presence and actions of trace elements in the soil-plant environment. The book provides information on the biogeochemistry of these elements and.   Having high stability not easily replaced by other nutrient elements in the soil. Each of the metals chelated are very stable against hydrolysis. Trace elements chelated are resistant to micro-biological decomposition. The chelated micro-nutrients are soluble in water. Not easily precipitated by ions or colloids in soils. Abstract. Fifteen or more elements present in rocks and soils normally in very small amounts are essential for plant and/or animal nutrition. By the nature of their low abundance in natural uncontaminated earth materials or plants, they are known as trace elements, minor elements or by: 5.

For most soils in south west Victoria, there is no clear data on responses to pastures to the application of the trace elements zinc, copper, cobalt, boron or manganese. There are however, special cases such as lighter soils where experience has shown that some trace elements are necessary. Still the Gold Standard Resource on Trace Elements and Metals in Soils. This highly anticipated fourth edition of the bestselling Trace Elements in Soils and Plants reflects the explosion of research during the past decade regarding the presence and actions of trace elements in the soil-plant environment. The book provides information on the biogeochemistry of these elements and explores how Cited by: A trace element is a chemical element whose concentration (or other measure of amount) is very low (a "trace amount"). The exact definition depends on the field of science: In analytical chemistry, a trace element is one whose average concentration is less than parts per million (ppm) measured in the atomic count or less than micrograms per gram.   It explains as well the trace-element contamination of the atmosphere and hydrosphere, the sources of trace-element contamination of soils, and the availability of trace elements in the soil. The consequences of trace-element contamination of the soil, including its Book Edition: 1.