Event-related slow potentials of the brain: their relations to behavior.
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Event-related slow potentials of the brain: their relations to behavior. Based on the proceedings of the 2nd International CNV Congress held in Vancouver, British Columbia, June 21-25, 1971. by International CNV Congress (2d 1971 Vancouver)

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Published by Elsevier Scientific Pub. Co. in Amsterdam, New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Electroencephalography -- Congresses,
  • Brain -- Congresses,
  • Neurophysiology -- Congresses

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references

StatementEdited by W. C. McCallum and J. R. Knott
SeriesElectroencephalography and clinical neurophysiology. Supplement no. 33
ContributionsMcCallum, W. Cheyne, Knott, J. R
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQP360 .I57 1971
The Physical Object
Paginationxvii, 390 p.
Number of Pages390
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14634209M

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McCallum WC, Knott JR (Eds.), Event-related slow potentials of the brain: their relations to behavior. Electroencephalogr Clin Neurophysiol (Suppl. 33), Elsevier, Amsterdam (), pp. Google ScholarCited by: 6.   McCallum WC, Knott JR () Event-related slow potentials of the brain: their relations to behavior. Electroencephalogr Clin Neurophysiol Google Scholar McCallum WC, Walter WG () The effects of attention and distraction on the contingent negative variation in normal and neurotic by: Slow potentials of the cerebral cortex and behavior Article Literature Review (PDF Available) in Physiological Reviews 70(1) February with 1, Reads How we measure 'reads'. The prevailing cognitive-psychological accounts of event-related brain potentials (ERPs) assume that ERP components manifest information processing operations leading from stimulus to Author: Boris Kotchoubey.

McCallum WC, Knott JR (Eds.), Event-related slow potentials of the brain: their relations to behavior, Elsevier, Amsterdam (), pp. Google Scholar Dongier and Bostem, Cited by: 1. Author(s): Knott,John R(John Russell),; McCallum,W Cheyne; International CNV Congress,(2d: Vancouver, B. C.) Title(s): Event-related slow. The book is recommended for medical libraries as a reference source. EDWARD 1" DOMINO UniversiO, ~71 Michi¢!an. Ann Arbor. Mich (U.S 4.) Event-related slow potentials of the brain and their relations to behavior. -- W. C. McCallum and J. R. Knott (Editors). (Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology. Microscopic. Neurons generate action potentials resulting from changes in the electric membrane potential. Neurons can generate multiple action potentials in sequence forming so-called spike trains. These spike trains are the basis for neural coding and information transfer in the brain. Spike trains can form all kinds of patterns, such as rhythmic spiking and bursting, and often .

Introduction. U nderstanding the human brain in health and disease is a societal imperative. Although data have accumulated for several centuries from postmortem, lesion behavior, and noninvasive electrophysiological studies (Finger, ; Finger et al., ), these data fall short of what is needed and certainly do not approach that available from other by: Slides + Book Ch. 7. STUDY. PLAY. Behavioral Neuroscience -Morris Water Maze analyzed the behavior of rats and their use of distal and local cues to find a platform in a murky pool. The region of the brain responsible for spacial learning, navigation, and encoding memories. Get this from a library! Human Evoked Potentials: Applications and Problems. [Dietrich Lehmann; Enoch Callaway] -- From August 25 - 28, a conference on averaged evoked po tentials was held at Konstanz, West Germany. Research on human evoked potentials has progressed rapidly in the past decade, and a series. Event-related potentials have been used to explore emotion processing in infants, children, and adults. Although the P has not been observed in infants, other ERP components have been used successfully with infants as young as 6 months of age (for review, see Nelson, ).